Communists and the Trade Union Left Revisited: the Case of the UK 1964–79

Roger Seifert, Tom Sibley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

"In the 1880s when Karl Marx lived in London and Frederick Engels worked in Manchester they wrote about the possibility of a socialist revolution in Great Britain. Much of their data collection and subsequent analysis was based on the Victorian Empire, and the class structure and struggle that emerged from the workings of capitalism in an advanced industrial state. Ever since then British communists have sought to decipher their predictions and turn them into concrete
revolutionary action and organization based on a largely Leninist approach to state power and revolution. This has meant a heavy dependence on the trade unions as the mass expression of working-class solidarity and struggle, and a continuous battle with the right wing social democrats who control the minds and actions of many in the mass party of the workers, the Labour Party. This article examines the period in modern history when the CPGB came closest to realizing its revolutionary potential and program through a mixture of a left push within the labor movement at both official levels and among grass roots working class activists in the unions and elsewhere.1"
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)112-126
Number of pages15
JournalWorld Review of Political Economy
Volume1
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Communist Party of Great Britain
  • the trade union left in the UK
  • social democracy

Cite this

Communists and the Trade Union Left Revisited: the Case of the UK 1964–79. / Seifert, Roger; Sibley, Tom .

In: World Review of Political Economy, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2010, p. 112-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seifert, Roger ; Sibley, Tom . / Communists and the Trade Union Left Revisited: the Case of the UK 1964–79. In: World Review of Political Economy. 2010 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. 112-126.
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